Chlamydia is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections in the world so if you believe that you may have contracted it, it's nothing to be embarrassed about.
In fact, an estimated 2.86 million Chlamydia infections occur in the United States annually so you’re far from alone! [1]


How do you check for Chlamydia from home?


If you’re experiencing symptoms of Chlamydia, it’s important to take a test - to keep your mind at ease and to avoid any future complications.

Unfortunately, as most cases of Chlamydia have no symptoms, there’s no way to accurately confirm or deny you have contracted it without testing. With this in mind, the best way to check for Chlamydia from home is with an at-home STI test.

LetsGetChecked’s range of at-home STI Tests detect the most common sexually transmitted infections. Testing for Chlamydia will involve a simple urine test and your results will be available online within 5 days.



Indicators of Chlamydia


Commonly referred to as the ‘silent infection’, Chlamydia often shows little to no symptoms. This can lead to a lot of untreated infections which can cause possible problems later on in life.

If symptoms appear, in women, they may include:

  • Pain when urinating
  • Unusual vaginal discharge
  • Pain in the tummy or pelvis
  • Pain during sex
  • Bleeding after sex
  • Bleeding between periods

If symptoms appear, in men, they may include:

  • Pain when urinating
  • White, cloudy or watery discharge from the tip of the penis
  • Burning or itching in the urethra
  • Pain in the testicles

If you’ve been experiencing symptoms of Chlamydia, it’s important to take a test. The best way to do this from home is with an at-home STI test.

You should take the LetsGetChecked STI Test if:

  • You become sexually active
  • You’ve had unprotected sex
  • You’re experiencing symptoms of a sexually transmitted infection
  • You’re entering into a new sexual relationship
  • You have received a notification from a previous partner that they are infected (STIs can remain dormant for years and/ or take up to three weeks to become detectable.)


References

  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Chlamydia - CDC Fact Sheet. Online: Cdc.gov, 2018