With thousands of cases of COVID-19 worldwide, there’s been a great deal of speculation surrounding the virus and its origin - in particular, whether this new strain of coronavirus is manmade.

We’re going to delve a little deeper into the origins of COVID-19 and provide some insight into the frequently asked question: is coronavirus manmade?


Is Coronavirus Manmade?


Human coronaviruses were first identified in the mid 1960’s, there are currently 7 strains that can affect humans - including the newest strain: SARS-CoV-2 [1].

Previous coronaviruses were commonly known to be zoonotic; this means that some coronaviruses which infect animals become able to infect humans [2]. This is what’s believed to have happened with the current coronavirus ,though of course, further detailed genetic analyses will help in confirming the definitive origin [3].

Where did the novel coronavirus originate?

The novel coronavirus (which causes COVID-19) was first reported in Wuhan, China in December of 2019. The first infections were linked to a live animal market but the virus is now spreading from person to person.


If you’re experiencing symptoms of COVID-19, stay at home and call your healthcare provider for medical advice as soon as possible.

It’s crucial to follow some simple steps in order to avoid contracting the coronavirus, these steps include [5]:

  • Clean your hands, carefully and often using soap and water
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick
  • Stay home if you’re sick
  • Cover coughs and sneezes with your elbow or a tissue, not your hands
  • Wear a facemask if you’re sick
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces regularly

References

  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Animals and Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). Online: Cdc.gov, 2020
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Animals and Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). Online: Cdc.gov, 2020
  3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Animals and Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). Online: Cdc.gov, 2020
  4. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Animals and Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). Online: Cdc.gov, 2020
  5. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Prevention. Online: Cdc.gov, 2020