As one of the two primary female sex hormones, estrogen plays a crucial role in puberty, controlling the menstrual cycle and fertility [1].

Whether you’re taking in too much estrogen through birth control pills or undergoing estrogen replacement therapy, there are a number reasons why your estrogen levels may fluctuate [2]. Whatever the reason, it’s important to stay in the know about your hormonal health and be aware of the signs that may indicate that something’s slightly off balance.

Common signs of high estrogen in women include [3]:

  • Weight gain
  • Menstrual problems, such as light or heavy bleeding
  • Worsening of premenstrual syndrome
  • Fibrocystic breasts (non-cancerous breast lumps)
  • Fibroids (noncancerous tumors) in the uterus
  • Fatigue
  • Loss of sex drive
  • Feeling depressed or anxious

See also: Estrogen Dominance: Symptoms and Signs


What happens when estrogen levels are high?


When you begin to experience a hormonal imbalance, you may begin experiencing certain signs and symptoms - both physical and emotional.

Some of the physical signs of high estrogen in women include [4]:

  • Headaches
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Breast tenderness
  • Weight gain
  • Irregular periods
  • More severe symptoms of PMS (premenstrual syndrome)
  • Fatigue
  • Insomnia
  • Lowered sex drive/libido
  • Hot flashes
  • Bloating

Some of the emotional signs of high estrogen in women include [5]:

  • Mood swings
  • Depression

See also: Can I Get Pregnant With High Estrogen Levels?


If you’re experiencing signs of fluctuating estrogen levels or you're simply looking to gain a better insight into your hormonal health, it’s recommended that you take a test! You can do this by taking a trip to your local doctor or from the comfort of your own home with an at-home lab test.

LetsGetChecked’s Female Hormone Test measures a key number of hormones, providing you with insights into your reproductive health.

As well as offering insight into your estrogen levels, it will help indicate hormonal imbalances such as:

  • Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS)
  • Ovarian failure
  • Low ovarian reserve
  • Early menopause
  • Menopause
  • Thyroid Issues
  • Ovulation function issues


References

  1. Society for Endocrinology. Estrogen. Online: Hormone.org, 2018
  2. Society for Endocrinology. Estrogen. Online: Hormone.org, 2018
  3. Society for Endocrinology. Estrogen. Online: Hormone.org, 2018
  4. Society for Endocrinology. Estrogen. Online: Hormone.org, 2018
  5. Society for Endocrinology. Estrogen. Online: Hormone.org, 2018