Gestational diabetes refers to cases of diabetes that develop during pregnancy - and typically disappears after giving birth. Gestational diabetes causes high blood sugar which can potentially impact the health of both the mother and the baby.

It's common for gestational diabetes to show little to no symptoms but if blood sugar levels become too high, you may experience symptoms such as:

  • Increased thirst
  • Needing to pee more often than usual
  • A dry mouth
  • Tiredness

If you’re concerned about any of the symptoms you may be experiencing, it’s important to speak with your doctor or midwife.

See also: What Is Diabetes?


Who is at risk of gestational diabetes?


It’s possible for any woman to develop gestational diabetes during pregnancy - in fact, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention state that every year 2%-10% of pregnancies in the United States are affected by it [2].

With that said, there are some factors that may increase your chances of developing it, these include:

  • Being overweight
  • Previously giving birth to a baby who weighed 4.5kg (10lb) or more at birth
  • Have experienced gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy
  • Family history of diabetes

If you’ve already been diagnosed with gestational diabetes it’s easy to feel overwhelmed but remember, once it’s been detected early and you keep a regular eye on your blood sugar levels, any risks associated with the condition can be reduced [3].

You can monitor your blood sugar levels with your doctor or from the comfort of your own home with an at-home lab test.

LetsGetChecked’s Diabetes Test tests for HBA1c - a high HbA1c result means that you have too much sugar in your blood. You will receive your online results within 5 days and our team of dedicated nurses will be on hand to answer any questions you may have.

See also: How Do You Check For Diabetes From Home?



References

  1. NHS. Gestational diabetes. Online: NHS.uk, 2019
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Gestational Diabetes. Online: CDC.gov, 2019
  3. NHS. Gestational diabetes. Online: NHS.uk, 2019