Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) plays an important role in the reproductive system. Responsible for regulating the function of the ovaries and pubertal development[1], a fluctuation in your FSH levels may leave you with a few questions which we’re here to answer!

Let’s learn a little more about the symptoms of high FSH in women, what causes this hormone imbalance and how you can check your FSH levels.


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What Are The Symptoms Of High FSH?


Produced by the pituitary gland, FSH plays a pretty important role in the reproductive system - affecting both egg and estrogen production [2].

Symptoms of high FSH usually mimic menopause, some of these symptoms can include [3]:

  • Irregular periods
  • Hot flashes
  • Disrupted sleep
  • Skin and hair changes
  • Difficulty getting pregnant

What causes high levels of FSH?


High FSH levels are commonly associated with menopause or perimenopause. In saying that, it’s important to remember that a single FSH test result isn’t a reliable indicator of your FSH levels as your hormones tend to fluctuate a good deal daily - it’s recommended you test your hormone levels up to five times over the course of a year.

Other common causes of high FSH may include:

  • Primary ovarian insufficiency [4]
  • Polycystic ovary syndrome [5]

What do high FSH levels mean?

High levels of FSH may indicate that there are now fewer, viable eggs available which can make it hard to conceive, or indicate that a woman is no longer fertile [6]. This is common amongst older women who’s fertility naturally begins to decline with age.


How can I check my FSH levels?


You can test your FSH levels with a simple blood test - this can be done with your local doctor or from the comfort of your own home with LetsGetChecked's Female Hormone Test.



Buy an At-Home Female Hormone Test

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Fast Results
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LetsGetChecked’s Female Hormone Test offers a comprehensive picture of your fertility status and is ideal for anyone who is curious about their fertility status. It must be taken on day 3 of your menstrual cycle to ensure accurate results.


References

  1. You and Your Hormones. Follicle Stimulating Hormone. Online: Yourhormones.info, 2018
  2. Mayo Clinic, Hypopituitarism. Online: Mayoclinic.org, 2019
  3. You and Your Hormones. Follicle Stimulating Hormone. Online: Yourhormones.info, 2018
  4. Mayo Clinic. Primary ovarian insufficiency. Online: Mayoclinic.org, 2019
  5. Mayo Clinic. Polycystic ovary syndrome. Online: Mayoclinic.org, 2017
  6. Yale Medicine. Women, How Good Are Your Eggs? Online: Yalemedicine.org, 2018