Insulin resistance occurs when the body can’t use insulin properly. Over time, your blood sugar levels will rise; this is why insulin resistance is commonly associated with an increased risk of developing diabetes[1].


As insulin resistance doesn’t typically show any noticeable symptoms, it’s important to regularly check your blood glucose levels - this can be done by taking a trip to your doctor or from home with an at-home lab test.

LetsGetChecked’s Diabetes Test checks the levels of glucose in your blood - helping identify prediabetes and determine how well your diabetes is being managed if you have already been diagnosed.

See also: How Do You Check For Diabetes From Home?



Causes of insulin resistance


When it comes to insulin resistance, there are some risk factors that are beyond your control, these include[2] :

  • Genetics
  • Age
  • Ethnicity
  • Family history

There are also some factors associated with insulin resistance that can be controlled, these include[3] :

  • Physical inactivity
  • Excess bodyweight
  • Smoking

Symptoms of insulin resistance


Insulin resistance is known to present little to no symptoms - signs only begin to show when it’s progressed to high blood sugar levels. When this occurs, symptoms may include[4] :

  • Frequent urination
  • Increased thirst
  • Blurred vision
  • Fatigue
  • Headache

See also: What Does High Blood Sugar Mean?


LetsGetChecked’s Diabetes Test determines your risk of diabetes (pre-diabetes) or how well your diabetes is being managed with online results in just 5 days.

You should consider taking the test if you[5] :

  • Are overweight
  • Are physically inactive
  • Have a parent, brother, or sister with type 2 diabetes
  • Are African American, Hispanic/Latino, American, Indian, Asian American, or Pacific Islander
  • Have polycystic ovary syndrome, also called PCOS
  • Have had gestational diabetes, a diabetes that develops during pregnancy
  • Have given birth to a baby weighing more than 9 pounds
  • Are aged 45 or older
  • Have had above-normal blood glucose levels
  • Have high blood pressure
  • Have low HDL (good) cholesterol
  • Have high levels of blood fats


References

  1. American Diabetes Association. All About Insulin Resistance. Online: Diabetes.org, 2009
  2. American Diabetes Association. All About Insulin Resistance. Online: Diabetes.org, 2009
  3. American Diabetes Association. All About Insulin Resistance. Online: Diabetes.org, 2009
  4. Mayo Clinic. Hyperglycemia in diabetes. Online: Mayoclinic.org, 2018
  5. American Diabetes Association. All About Insulin Resistance. Online: Diabetes.org, 2009