Vitamin B12 is a water-soluble vitamin largely found in animal products. It plays a crucial role in determining your energy levels and is primarily responsible for:

  • Making red blood cells
  • Keeping the nervous system healthy
  • Releasing energy from food
  • Using folic acid

If you’re deficient in Vitamin B12, you may experience a number of signs and symptoms - from fatigue to memory loss. Having said that, how do you know if you have Vitamin B12 deficiency? What are the symptoms and can you test your Vitamin B12 levels?

See also: What Are The Functions Of Vitamins?


Symptoms of Vitamin B12 Deficiency


Vitamin B12 deficiency commonly occurs when a lack of Vitamin B12 causes the body to produce abnormally large red blood cells that can’t carry oxygen around the body properly [1].

Some symptoms of Vitamin B12 deficiency may include:

  • Extreme tiredness
  • Lack of energy
  • A sore and red tongue
  • Mouth ulcers
  • Muscle weakness
  • Disturbed vision
  • Psychological problems, which may include depression and confusion
  • Problems with memory, understanding and judgement

See also: 5 Foods High In Vitamin B12


How can you test your Vitamin B12 levels?


It’s important to keep an eye on your vitamin levels and monitor them regularly. This can be done by visiting your local doctor or taking a vitamin test from the comfort of your own home.


At LetsGetChecked, we offer an at home Vitamin B12 test which will be able to indicate if you have a Vitamin B12 deficiency.

LetsGetChecked’s at-home Vitamin B12 test is a simple finger prick test which can identify key deficiencies in Vitamin B12.



You should take a test if:

  • You’re suffering from chronic fatigue
  • You’re following a plant-based diet
  • You’re planning on becoming pregnant
  • You’re over the age of 50
  • You suffer from Crohn's disease
  • You suffer from Coeliac disease
  • You’re deficient in the intrinsic factor, a glycoprotein which plays an important role in absorbing vitamin B12

References

  1. NHS. B vitamins and folic acid. Online: NHS.uk, 2017