HPV is so common that nearly all sexually active men and women will contract the virus at some point in their lives. If you have tested positive for HPV, there is really no evidence that suggests you should stop having sex with your partner - unless your doctor tells you otherwise [1].

Though it might seem irresponsible to have sex when you know you have an infection - HPV is so common that people should assume they’re having sex with someone who already has it.

See also: What Is HPV?



Can a woman give a man HPV?


If you have HPV infection, there is no way to completely prevent infecting your sexual partner - even if you always use protection. As the virus is located in skin cells, so HPV can infect genital areas not covered by a condom [2].

If you’re sexually active, there are things that you can do to decrease the risk of spreading the infection:

  • Get the HPV vaccine and encourage your partner to do the same
  • Use condoms and/or dental dams every time you have vaginal, anal, or oral sex
  • Limit your number of sexual partners

See also: How do you get HPV?


Is HPV curable?


Most people who get infected with HPV will clear the virus within a couple of years. However, for some people the infection will be long-lasting.

If you test positive for HPV, there’s no treatment to get rid of the virus. However, a healthy immune system will usually clear the infection over time and people may never know they were infected [3].

See also: Why Is It Important To Check For HPV?


One of the best ways to ensure you and your partner maintain good sexual health is through regular HPV screening, this can be done by taking a trip to your doctor’s office or from the comfort of your own home with an at-home lab test.

LetsGetChecked’s at-home HPV Test detects strains that are considered high-risk for developing cervical cancer. Online results will be available within 5-7 days and our dedicated medical team will be available every step of the way to answer any questions you may have.



References

  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. HPV. Online: Cdc.gov, 2019
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. HPV. Online: Cdc.gov, 2019
  3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. HPV. Online: Cdc.gov, 2019